Kimberly shares her stories of 2VBA4C (two VBAC’s After 4 Cesareans) and birth after a loss. Her first C-section was due to a failed induction and pressure from her doctor. She went on to have a great VBAC experience followed by another C-section and was pressured into another one after she was told her provider “doesn’t do” VBA2C. Her fourth Cesarean was due to loss and then she was able to have another VBAC for her next birth. Her story has so many ups and downs and is inspiring and motivating. This one is a tearjerker. You can find the info about VBAC induction on our VBAC blog at: thevbaclink.com/blog.

Please note: in order to get stories from all over the country, and even other countries, we record using phone lines. For this reason, audio quality may vary between episodes and speakers.

Rachel is on today’s episode sharing her birth stories. For her first child’s birth, Rachel was offered a Cesarean at 30 weeks pregnant because her doctor thought her baby was too big. When she finally delivered at 39 weeks, her baby was just eight pounds, five ounces. She was scared into an induction that led to Cesarean by her doctor who told her horror stories about women who had “big babies.”  Her VBAC pregnancy was just four months after her Cesarean and labor was only a few hours long. You can read more about failure to progress, what that really means, and what is DOESN’T mean on our VBAC blog: thevbaclink.com/blog.

Please note, in order to get stories from all over the country, and even other countries, we record using phone lines. For this reason, audio quality may vary between episodes and speakers.

Today we talk to Miranda, who is such an engaging storyteller! You will love listening to her tell her birth stories. Her provider told her she can schedule her birth like she schedules a haircut! Miranda had two Cesareans, one unplanned, and one scheduled, after her provider did a major bait and switch and went quickly from VBAC supportive to unsupportive when Miranda hit 41 weeks and everything didn’t go perfectly. She then went on to have a safe and successful VBA2C with an induction. You can find out all the details about VBA2C on our VBAC blog: thevbaclink.com/blog.

Please note, in order to get stories from all over the country, and even other countries, we record using phone lines. For this reason, audio quality may vary between episodes and speakers.

Shiraya worked hard to learn everything she possibly could to prepare for her HBAC (home birth after Cesarean).  For her first child’s birth, she was unprepared for everything that would happen. An asynclitic baby led her to a Cesarean at 8cm dilated. When she found out she was expecting baby number two, she knew she wanted a different experience and found a supportive birth center with a midwife who trusted in her ability to birth. Shiraya’s third baby was a home birth transfer that ended in another VBAC, but was slightly traumatic. Her story is so inspiring and you will be laughing along with this fun woman of strength. Find out more about home birth safety on our VBAC blog: thevbaclink.com/blog.

Please note, in order to get stories from all over the country, and even other countries, we record using phone lines. For this reason, audio quality may vary between episodes and speakers.

What an incredible episode we have for you today! Lyn Christian is Julie’s and Meagan’s business mentor, a triple-certified business coach, and a master of all things conversational intelligence. We talk all about how to have an effective conversation with those you love and care deeply for that may not be supportive of your birth choices. If you have ever felt judged or hurt by people who you want to support you, this is a must-listen! You can find out more about Lyn on her website, soulsalt.com, and find the referenced TedX talk Head, Heart, and Gut here. We have an overview of how to have an effective conversation about VBAC with loved ones on our VBAC blog at thevbaclink.com/blog.

Please note, to get stories from all over the country and even other countries, we record using phone lines. For this reason, audio quality may vary between episodes and speakers.

Play this podcast on Podbean App